How to Train a Dachshund Puppy – Pet's Satisfaction

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How to Train a Dachshund Puppy

Dachshunds grass training

Dachshunds are adorable, loyal, and intelligent dogs that can bring joy and companionship to any family. But they are also notoriously stubborn, independent, and hard to train. If you have a dachshund puppy or are thinking of getting one, you might be wondering how to train a dachshund puppy to be well-behaved, obedient, and happy.

Training a dachshund puppy is not impossible, but it does require patience, consistency, and positive reinforcement. Dachshunds are not like other dogs; they have their own quirks and challenges that make them unique. You need to understand their history, personality, and behavior problems in order to train them effectively.

By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of how to train a dachshund puppy and enjoy a harmonious relationship with your furry friend. So let’s get started!

Dachshund Training: Unique and Challenging

Dachshunds are not like other dogs; they have their own quirks and challenges that make them unique. In order to train them effectively, you need to understand what makes them tick and how to motivate them. In this section, we will explore the history and personality of the dachshund breed, the common behavior problems and how to avoid them, and the benefits of positive reinforcement training for dachshunds.

Dachshund's History and Personality

The dachshund is a German breed that was originally developed to hunt badgers and other small animals in underground burrows. Their name literally means “badger dog” in German. Because of their hunting heritage, dachshunds are very brave, curious, and independent. They have a strong prey drive and a keen sense of smell. They are also very loyal, affectionate, and playful with their owners.

However, these traits also make them stubborn, willful, and hard to train. Dachshunds tend to think for themselves and do what they want. They can be easily distracted by scents and sounds. They can also be possessive of their toys, food, and territory. They may bark excessively, dig holes, or chase small animals. They may also resist following commands or learning new skills.

Dachshunds are very brave, curious, and independent.

Common Behavior Problems and Solutions

As every dog breed, dachshunds come with their own set of issues - but no worries, there's always a solution! Some of the most common behavior problems that dachshund owners face are:

  • Barking: Dachshunds bark for various reasons, such as alerting, boredom, excitement, fear, or attention-seeking. To reduce barking, you need to identify the cause and address it accordingly. For example, you can provide your dachshund with enough exercise, mental stimulation, and socialization to prevent boredom and frustration. You can also teach your dachshund a “quiet” command and reward them for being silent.
  • Digging: Dachshunds dig because of their natural instinct to hunt underground. To prevent digging, you can provide your dachshund with a designated digging area where they can satisfy their urge without damaging your garden or lawn. You can also redirect their attention to other activities when they start digging elsewhere.
  • Chasing: Dachshunds chase because of their prey drive and curiosity. To prevent chasing, you need to keep your dachshund on a leash or in a fenced area when outdoors. You can also teach your dachshund a “leave it” command and reward them for ignoring potential distractions.

To reduce barking, digging, and chasing you need to identify the cause and address it accordingly.

Positive Reinforcement Training Benefits

Positive reinforcement training is the best way to train your dachshund puppy. Positive reinforcement training means rewarding your dachshund for doing what you want them to do, rather than punishing them for doing what you don’t want them to do. Positive reinforcement training has many benefits for your dachshund, such as:

  • Builds trust and respect between you and your dachshund.
  • Enhances your dachshund’s confidence and self-esteem.
  • Makes learning fun and enjoyable for your dachshund.
  • Reduces stress and anxiety for both you and your dachshund.
  • Improves your dachshund’s behavior and obedience.

To use positive reinforcement training effectively, you need to follow some basic principles:

  • Use treats, toys, praise, or anything else that your dachshund likes as rewards.
  • Reward your dachshund immediately (!) after they perform the desired behavior.
  • Be consistent and clear with your commands and expectations.
  • Keep the training sessions short and frequent.
  • Avoid using force, fear, or pain as correction methods.

Positive reinforcement training means rewarding your dachshund for doing what you want them to do.

Teaching Basic Commands to Your Dachshund

One of the most important aspects of training your dachshund puppy is teaching them the basic commands that every dog should know. These commands will help you communicate with your dachshund, control their behavior, and keep them safe. In the following, you will learn how to teach your dachshund the basic commands of sit, stay, come, and heel. We will also show you how to train your dachshund to walk on a leash and stop pulling

Using Treats, Toys, and Praise as Motivators

The key to teaching your dachshund the basic commands is using treats, toys, and praise as motivators. Dachshunds are food-driven and love to play, so they will respond well to positive reinforcement. You can use any kind of treat or toy that your dachshund likes, as long as it is small, soft, and easy to swallow. You can also use verbal praise, such as “good boy” or “good girl”, and physical affection, such as petting or scratching, to reward your dachshund.

To use treats, toys, and praise effectively, you need to follow some simple rules:

  • Use a clear and consistent cue for each command, such as a word or a hand signal.
  • Reward your dachshund immediately (!) after they perform the desired behavior.
  • Gradually reduce the frequency of rewards as your dachshund learns the command.
  • Vary the type and amount of rewards to keep your dachshund interested and motivated.
  • Avoid using treats, toys, or praise as bribes or distractions.

The key to teaching your dachshund the basic commands is using treats, toys, and praise as motivators.

Training to Sit, Stay, Come, and Heel

The four basic commands that every dachshund should know are sit, stay, come, and heel. These commands will help you manage your dachshund’s behavior in different situations and environments. Here are some steps on how to teach these commands to your dachshund:

  • Sit: Hold a treat in front of your dachshund’s nose and slowly move it up and back over their head. As your dachshund follows the treat with their eyes, they will naturally lower their rear end to the ground. As soon as they sit, say “sit” and give them the treat and praise. Repeat this several times until your dachshund associates the word “sit” with the action. Then try saying “sit” without using the treat and reward your dachshund when they obey.
  • Stay: Ask your dachshund to sit and then say “stay” while showing them your palm. Take a few steps back and wait for a few seconds. If your dachshund stays in place, say “yes” or click a clicker and give them a treat and praise. If they move or get up, say “no” or “uh-uh” and start over. Gradually increase the distance and duration of the stay command until your dachshund can stay for longer periods and in different distractions.
  • Come: Put a leash on your dachshund and let them wander around. Then say “come” in a cheerful tone and gently tug on the leash. As soon as your dachshund comes to you, give them a treat and praise. Repeat this several times until your dachshund responds to the word “come” without needing the leash. Then try saying “come” without using the leash and reward your dachshund when they obey.
  • Heel: Put a leash on your dachshund and hold it in your left hand. Hold a treat in your right hand near your left hip. Say “heel” and start walking forward. As long as your dachshund stays by your side, give them small bits of the treat and praise. If they pull ahead or lag behind, stop walking and say “no” or “uh-uh”. Then start over from where you stopped. Repeat this until your dachshund learns to walk by your side without needing the treat.

The four basic commands that every dachshund should know are sit, stay, come, and heel.

Training to Walk on a Leash and Stop Pulling

Another essential skill that every dachshund should learn is how to walk on a leash without pulling. Pulling on the leash can be dangerous for both you and your dachshund, as it can cause injuries, accidents, or escapes. To train your dachshund to walk on a leash and stop pulling, you need to follow some simple steps:

  • Choose a suitable leash and collar for your dachshund. Avoid using choke chains or prong collars that can hurt your dachshund’s neck. Instead, use a flat collar or a harness that fits snugly but comfortably on your dachshund. Use a short leash that gives you enough control but also allows your dachshund some freedom to explore.
  • Start the training indoors or in a quiet area where there are no distractions. Put the leash and collar on your dachshund and let them get used to it. Then hold the leash in your right hand and a treat in your left hand. Say “let’s go” and start walking forward. As long as your dachshund follows you, give them small bits of the treat and praise. If they pull on the leash, stop walking and say “no” or “uh-uh”. Then wait until they stop pulling and look at you. Then say “let’s go” and resume walking. Repeat this until your dachshund learns to walk without pulling.
  • Gradually move the training to more challenging areas where there are more distractions, such as other people, dogs, or noises. Use the same technique as before, but be prepared to stop more often and reward less frequently. If your dachshund gets too excited or distracted, try to redirect their attention to you by using a toy, a whistle, or a command.

To train your dachshund to walk on a leash and stop pulling, you need to follow some simple steps.

Housetraining Your Dachshund in Weeks

One of the most common challenges that dachshund owners face is housetraining their puppies. Housetraining is the process of teaching your dachshund where and when to eliminate their waste. Housetraining is essential for your dachshund’s health, hygiene, and happiness. It is also important for your sanity and peace of mind. Here, you will learn you how to housetrain your dachshund puppy in a few weeks.

Choosing the Right Crate, Bed, and Potty Area

The first step in housetraining your dachshund puppy is choosing the right crate, bed, and potty area for them. These items will help you create a comfortable and consistent environment for your dachshund, which will make the housetraining process easier and faster.

Crate

The crate (a metal or plastic box) serves as your dachshund’s den. A crate provides your dachshund with a safe and cozy place to sleep, rest, and relax. It also prevents your dachshund from having accidents or getting into trouble when you are not around. You can use a crate to confine your dachshund when you are away, at night, or during the training sessions. To choose the right crate for your dachshund, you need to consider the size, shape, and type of the crate. The crate should be large enough for your dachshund to stand up, turn around, and lie down comfortably, but not too large that they can use one corner as a bathroom.

It should be rectangular or square in shape, as round or oval crates can make your dachshund feel insecure or claustrophobic. The crate should be either wire or plastic, as these materials are durable, easy to clean, and well-ventilated. You can also add a soft blanket or a mat to make the crate more comfortable for your dachshund.

Bed

This cushion or mattress serves as your dachshund’s sleeping spot. A bed provides your dachshund with a warm and comfortable place to snooze and cuddle. It also helps your dachshund associate their bed with sleeping and resting, rather than eliminating. You can use a bed to let your dachshund sleep with you in your bedroom or in another room of your choice. To choose the right bed for your dachshund, you need to consider the size, shape, and material of the bed.

It should be large enough for your dachshund to stretch out comfortably, but not too large that they can use one corner as a bathroom. The bed should be round or oval in shape, as these shapes can make your dachshund feel secure and cozy. This sleeping spot should be made of soft and washable material, such as cotton, fleece, or microfiber.

Potty Area

A potty area is a designated spot where your dachshund can eliminate their waste. A potty area provides your dachshund with a convenient and consistent place to do their business. It also helps your dachshund learn where and when to go potty, rather than anywhere and anytime. You can use a potty area to train your dachshund to go outside or inside depending on your preference and situation. To choose the right potty area for your dachshund, you need to consider the location, size, and surface of the potty area.

The potty area should be located in a quiet and accessible place that is close to where your dachshund spends most of their time. This area should be large enough for your dachshund to move around comfortably, but not too large that they can use one corner as a bathroom. It should have a surface that is easy to clean and distinguishable from other surfaces in your home. For example, you can use grass, gravel, or artificial turf for an outdoor potty area, or pee pads, newspaper, or litter box for an indoor potty area.

The first step in housetraining your dachshund puppy is choosing the right crate, bed, and potty area for them.

Establishing a Feeding and Potty Schedule

The second step in housetraining your dachshund puppy is establishing a feeding and potty schedule for them. A feeding and potty schedule is a routine that dictates when and how often you feed and take your dachshund to their potty area. A feeding and potty schedule helps you regulate your dachshund’s digestion and elimination patterns. It also helps you predict when your dachshund needs to go potty, which will prevent accidents and make the housetraining process smoother and faster.

To establish a feeding and potty schedule for your dachshund, you need to follow some simple rules:

  • Feed your dachshund at the same time every day, preferably in the morning and evening. Avoid feeding your dachshund too late at night or too early in the morning, as this can disrupt their sleep and potty cycle. You can also divide your dachshund’s daily food intake into three or four smaller meals throughout the day, as this can help them digest their food better and reduce the risk of bloating or vomiting.
  • Take your dachshund to their potty area at regular intervals, such as every two to four hours, depending on their age and bladder capacity. You should also take your dachshund to their potty area first thing in the morning, last thing at night, and after every meal, nap, play, or training session. You can use a timer or an alarm to remind you when it is time to take your dachshund to their potty area.
  • Praise and reward your dachshund every time they go potty in their potty area. You can use treats, toys, or verbal praise to reinforce your dachshund’s positive behavior. You can also use a cue word or a phrase, such as “go potty” or “do your business”, to associate the action with the command. This will help your dachshund learn to go potty on command when you take them to their potty area.

A feeding and potty schedule helps you regulate your dachshund’s digestion and elimination patterns.

Dealing with Accidents and Setbacks

The third step in housetraining your dachshund puppy is dealing with accidents and setbacks that may occur during the housetraining process. Accidents and setbacks are inevitable and normal when housetraining a puppy. They can be caused by various factors, such as stress, illness, excitement, confusion, or lack of supervision. Accidents and setbacks do not mean that your dachshund is untrainable or that you are doing something wrong. They are simply part of the learning curve that you and your dachshund need to overcome.

To deal with accidents and setbacks effectively, you need to follow some simple rules:

  • Do not punish or scold your dachshund for having an accident. Punishing or scolding your dachshund will only make them fearful, anxious, or resentful of you. It will also not teach them what they did wrong or what they should do instead. Punishing or scolding your dachshund may also cause them to hide their accidents or avoid going potty in front of you.
  • Do not rub your dachshund’s nose in their mess or force them to look at it. This is a cruel and ineffective method that will only confuse and hurt your dachshund. It will also not teach them what they did wrong or what they should do instead. Rubbing your dachshund’s nose in their mess or forcing them to look at it may also cause them to develop a negative association with their potty area or their crate.
  • Do not clean up the mess in front of your dachshund. Cleaning up the mess in front of your dachshund may unintentionally reinforce their behavior by giving them attention or making them think that they are helping you. It may also confuse them about where they are supposed to go potty.
  • Do clean up the mess as soon as possible when your dachshund is not around. Cleaning up the mess as soon as possible will prevent your dachshund from smelling it and repeating it. It will also prevent odors from lingering in your home and attracting other animals or insects. Use an enzymatic cleaner or a vinegar solution to remove the stain and odor from the affected area.
  • Do interrupt your dachshund if you catch them in the act of having an accident. Interrupting your dachshund will stop them from finishing their business and give you a chance to redirect them to their potty area. You can interrupt your dachshund by making a loud noise, such as clapping your hands or saying “no” or “uh-uh”. Then quickly take them to their potty area and praise and reward them if they go potty there.

Accidents and setbacks are inevitable and normal when housetraining a puppy.

Socializing Your Dachshund with People and Dogs

Another important aspect of training your dachshund puppy is socializing them with people and dogs. Socializing is the process of exposing your dachshund to different people, places, and situations in a positive and safe way. Socializing is essential for your dachshund’s development and well-being. It is also important for your relationship and enjoyment with your dachshund. In the following, you will learn you how to socialize your dachshund with people and dogs.

Why Socialization is Crucial for Your Dachshund

Socialization is crucial for your dachshund because it helps them:

  • Learn how to behave appropriately and politely with other people and dogs.
  • Develop confidence and trust in themselves and others.
  • Adapt to new and changing environments and circumstances.
  • Prevent or reduce behavioral problems such as aggression, fear, or anxiety.

The best time to socialize your dachshund is when they are between 8 and 16 weeks old. This is the period when your dachshund is most receptive and curious about the world around them. However, socialization is a lifelong process that should continue throughout your dachshund’s life.

Socialization is crucial for your dachshund because it helps them learn how to behave appropriately and politely with other people and dogs.

Introducing Your Dachshund to Different People, Places, and Situations

To introduce your dachshund to different people, places, and situations, you need to follow some simple steps:

  • Start slowly and gradually. Do not overwhelm or overstimulate your dachshund with too many new experiences at once. Start with familiar and comfortable settings, such as your home or backyard. Then move on to more challenging and diverse settings, such as a park or a pet store.
  • Make every experience positive and fun. Use treats, toys, praise, or play to reward your dachshund for being calm and friendly. Avoid forcing or scaring your dachshund into doing something they are not comfortable with. Let them explore and interact at their own pace and level of interest.
  • Be patient and consistent. Do not expect your dachshund to be perfect or friendly with everyone and everything right away. Some people, places, or situations may take longer or more repetitions for your dachshund to get used to. Keep practicing and reinforcing your dachshund’s positive behavior until they become confident and relaxed.

Start slowly and gradually. Do not overwhelm or overstimulate your dachshund with too many new experiences at once.

Preventing or Correcting Aggression, Fear, or Anxiety

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, your dachshund may show signs of aggression, fear, or anxiety when socializing with people or dogs. These signs may include:

  • Growling, snarling, snapping, or biting.
  • Barking, whining, or howling.
  • Shaking, trembling, or hiding.
  • Cowering, tucking tail, or flattening ears.

These signs may indicate that your dachshund is feeling threatened, stressed, or insecure. They may also indicate that your dachshund has had a bad or traumatic experience in the past that has affected their behavior. To prevent or correct these signs, you need to follow some simple steps:

  • Identify the cause and trigger of your dachshund’s behavior. Try to figure out what makes your dachshund act aggressively, fearfully, or anxiously. Is it a certain person, dog, place, or situation? Is it a loud noise, a sudden movement, or an unfamiliar object? Is it a lack of socialization, a medical condition, or a genetic predisposition?
  • Avoid exposing your dachshund to the cause and trigger of their behavior. Do not force or expose your dachshund to something that makes them uncomfortable or unhappy. This will only make their behavior worse and damage their trust in you. Instead, try to avoid or remove the cause and trigger of their behavior as much as possible.
  • Seek professional help if necessary. If your dachshund’s behavior is severe or persistent, you may need to consult a veterinarian or a dog trainer for advice and assistance. They can help you diagnose the root of the problem and provide you with a suitable treatment plan. They can also help you teach your dachshund coping skills and alternative behaviors that are more appropriate and positive.

Identify the cause and trigger of your dachshund’s behavior.

Conclusion

Dachshunds are amazing dogs that can make any family happy. But they are also special and challenging dogs that need special attention and care when it comes to training. If you follow the steps and guidelines in this article, you can train your dachshund puppy to be well-behaved, obedient, and happy.

Keep in mind that training your dachshund puppy is not a one-time event, but a continuous process that requires patience, consistency, and positive reinforcement. You also need to understand your dachshund’s history, personality, and behavior problems in order to train them effectively. And most importantly, you need to love your dachshund and have fun with them!

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