Why Dachshunds Are the Worst Breed – Pet's Satisfaction

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Why Dachshunds Are the Worst Breed

Dachshunds painting

If you are a dog lover, you might have a soft spot for dachshunds. These adorable dogs have a long and low body, floppy ears, and a wagging tail that make them look like cute and cuddly sausages. You might think that dachshunds are the perfect breed for you, but you might be wrong. In fact, dachshunds are the worst breed for many reasons.

Why dachshunds are the worst breed? Well, for starters, dachshunds are prone to serious health problems that can affect their quality of life and cost you a fortune in vet bills. Dachshunds are also difficult to train and housebreak, as they are stubborn and independent. Dachshunds are noisy and destructive, as they love to bark, dig, and chew on everything. Dachshunds are not very friendly or sociable, as they can be aggressive and suspicious of other dogs and strangers. Dachshunds are not the ideal companions for anyone who wants a calm, obedient, and affectionate dog.

Of course, dachshunds are not all bad. They have some redeeming qualities that make them loyal and loving pets for some people. But before you decide to get a dachshund, you should be aware of the challenges and drawbacks of owning this breed. In this article, we will explore in detail why dachshunds are the worst breed and what you can do to deal with their problems. You might be surprised by what you learn, so keep reading!

Dachshund Health Problems

Dachshunds are adorable dogs with their long bodies and short legs, but they also have some serious health problems that can affect their quality of life. We will learn about some of the most common health issues in Dachshunds, why they occur, and how to prevent or treat them. If you love Dachshunds, you need to be aware of these potential problems and how to keep your furry friend healthy and happy.

Dachshunds’ Back Issues

One of the most distinctive features of Dachshunds is their elongated spine, which makes them prone to back problems. The most serious and common one is intervertebral disc disease (IVDD), which occurs when the discs between the vertebrae become damaged and compress the spinal cord. This can cause severe pain, weakness, paralysis, and even death in some cases. IVDD can be caused by trauma, aging, genetics, or obesity. Dachshunds are 10 times more likely to develop IVDD than any other dog breed.

To prevent IVDD, you should keep your Dachshund at a healthy weight, avoid letting them jump on and off furniture or stairs, provide them with a supportive bed, and limit their exercise to low-impact activities. You should also monitor your Dachshund for any signs of back pain, such as reluctance to move, shivering, arched back, crying, or dragging the hind legs.

If you notice any of these symptoms, take your Dachshund to the vet immediately. Depending on the severity of the condition, your vet may prescribe painkillers, anti-inflammatory drugs, steroids, or surgery. Some Dachshunds may need a wheelchair or cart to help them move around.

One of the most distinctive features of Dachshunds is their elongated spine, which makes them prone to back problems.

Dachshunds’ Dental Issues

Another common health problem in Dachshunds is dental disease, which can affect their teeth and gums. Dachshunds have small mouths and crowded teeth, which make them more susceptible to plaque, tartar, gingivitis, and periodontal disease. These conditions can cause bad breath, tooth loss, infection, and pain. Dental disease can also affect other organs, such as the heart, liver, and kidneys, if bacteria enter the bloodstream.

To prevent dental disease, you should brush your Dachshund’s teeth daily with a dog-friendly toothpaste and toothbrush. Provide them with dental chews, toys, and treats that can help clean their teeth and massage their gums. You should also take your Dachshund to the vet for regular dental check-ups and professional cleaning. Your vet may recommend extracting some teeth if they are too crowded or damaged.

Dachshunds have small mouths and crowded teeth, which make them more susceptible to plaque, tartar, gingivitis, and periodontal disease.

Other Common Health Problems & Treatments

Besides back and dental issues, Dachshunds may also suffer from other health problems, such as:

  • Hip dysplasia: This is a genetic condition that affects the hip joint, causing it to be loose and unstable. This can lead to arthritis, pain, and lameness. Hip dysplasia can be diagnosed by X-rays and treated with medication, physical therapy, weight management, or surgery.
  • Patellar luxation: This is a condition that affects the kneecap, causing it to slip out of its groove. This can cause limping, pain, and inflammation. Patellar luxation can be diagnosed by physical examination and treated with medication, rest, or surgery.
  • Obesity: This is a condition that affects the body weight, causing it to be excessive and unhealthy. This can lead to diabetes, heart disease, joint problems, and reduced lifespan. Obesity can be prevented and treated by feeding your Dachshund a balanced diet, measuring their portions, limiting their treats, and increasing their exercise.
  • Eye problems: Dachshunds may also have eye problems, such as cataracts, glaucoma, progressive retinal atrophy, and dry eye. These conditions can cause vision loss, pain, and irritation. Eye problems can be diagnosed by an eye exam and treated with medication, eye drops, or surgery.

Besides back and dental issues, Dachshunds may also suffer from other health problems, such as hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, obesity, and eye problems.

Dachshund Training Difficulties

Dachshunds are cute and loyal dogs, but they are also notoriously difficult to train and housebreak. If you are thinking of getting a Dachshund, you need to be prepared for the challenges that come with this breed. Here, we will explain why Dachshunds are hard to train and housebreak, what you need to do to succeed, and some strategies to overcome the common problems.

Stubbornness & Independence as Training Challenges

Dachshunds were originally bred to hunt badgers and other small animals in underground tunnels. They had to be brave, independent, and persistent to do their job. These traits are still present in modern Dachshunds, and they make them stubborn and resistant to training. Dachshunds tend to think for themselves and do what they want, rather than follow your commands. They may also get bored or distracted easily during training sessions, and lose interest in learning new skills.

To train a Dachshund, you need to be patient, firm, and consistent. You need to establish yourself as the leader and make your Dachshund respect you and your rules. Make training fun and rewarding for your Dachshund, and use positive reinforcement methods, such as treats, praise, and toys. Avoid harsh punishments, such as yelling, hitting, or scolding, as they can make your Dachshund fearful, aggressive, or more defiant.

Dachshunds tend to think for themselves and do what they want, rather than follow your commands.

Need for Consistency & Positive Reinforcement

Dachshunds are sensitive and emotional dogs, and they need a lot of love and attention from their owners. They also need a lot of consistency and positive reinforcement to learn and behave well. Dachshunds can be easily confused or discouraged by mixed signals, unclear expectations, or negative feedback. They can also develop bad habits, such as barking, digging, chewing, or jumping, if they are not given enough exercise, stimulation, or socialization.

To train a Dachshund, you need to be clear, concise, and consistent. You need to use the same words, tone, and gestures for each command, and repeat them until your Dachshund understands and obeys. Reward your Dachshund every time they do something right, and ignore or redirect them when they do something wrong. You should never reward your Dachshund for bad behavior, even if they are cute or funny, as this will only encourage them to repeat it.

You need to reward your Dachshund every time they do something right, and ignore or redirect them when they do something wrong.

Strategies to Overcome Housebreaking Difficulties

One of the most challenging aspects of training a Dachshund is housebreaking. Dachshunds are notoriously hard to potty train, and they may take longer than other breeds to learn where and when to go. Dachshunds have small bladders and fast metabolisms, which means they need to go more often and can’t hold it for long. They also have a strong sense of smell and may be attracted to their own or other animals’ scent marks. These dogs may also be reluctant to go outside in bad weather, such as rain, snow, or cold.

To housebreak a Dachshund, you need to be diligent, attentive, and persistent. You need to follow a regular schedule and take your Dachshund outside frequently, especially after they wake up, eat, drink, play, or nap. Choose a designated spot for your Dachshund to go, and praise and reward them when they do. You also need to watch your Dachshund for any signs of needing to go, such as sniffing, circling, whining, or scratching, and take them outside immediately. Clean up any accidents thoroughly and use an odor neutralizer to remove any traces of smell.

You need to follow a regular schedule and take your Dachshund outside frequently, especially after they wake up, eat, drink, play, or nap.

Dachshund Noise & Destruction

Dachshunds are charming and loyal dogs, but they also have some drawbacks that can make them the worst breed for some people. One of these drawbacks is their tendency to be noisy and destructive. We will explore why Dachshunds are so loud and messy, and how to prevent them from ruining your home and peace of mind.

Barking & Hunting Habits

Dachshunds are notorious for their loud and frequent barking. They bark for many reasons, such as to alert you of potential threats, to demand attention, to express excitement, to respond to other dogs, or to vent their frustration. Dachshunds have large lungs and powerful voices, which make their barks surprisingly loud for their small size. They also have a strong hunting instinct, which makes them chase and bark at anything that moves, such as squirrels, birds, or cars.

To reduce your Dachshund’s barking, you need to provide them with enough exercise, mental stimulation, and socialization. You also need to teach them the “quiet” command, and reward them for being silent. You should avoid yelling at them, as this can make them bark more or become fearful. You should also use positive reinforcement methods, such as treats, praise, and toys, to encourage good behavior. You can also use a spray bottle, a citronella collar, or a noise device to deter them from barking, but only as a last resort.

Dachshunds are notorious for their loud and frequent barking.

Digging & Chewing Habits

Dachshunds are also known for their love for digging and chewing. They dig for many reasons, such as to follow their prey, to hide their food, to cool off, to escape, or to relieve boredom. Dachshunds chew for many reasons, such as to explore, to soothe their gums, to release stress, to get your attention, or to have fun. Dachshunds have strong jaws and teeth, which make them capable of destroying your furniture, shoes, clothes, or plants.

To prevent your Dachshund from digging and chewing, you need to give them more physical and mental stimulation. Provide them with appropriate toys and chews, and rotate them regularly to keep them interested. You should also keep your valuables out of their reach, and spray your furniture and plants with a bitter deterrent. Monitor your Dachshund for any signs of anxiety, boredom, or pain, and address them accordingly. Don't forget to praise and reward your Dachshund for playing with their toys and chews, and ignore or redirect them when they play with something else.

Dachshunds have strong jaws and teeth, which make them capable of destroying your furniture, shoes, clothes, or plants.

How to Prevent Property Damage

Dachshunds are noisy and destructive dogs, but they are not hopeless. With proper training, management, and care, you can prevent them from damaging your property and disturbing your neighbors. Here are some tips to help you:

  • Crate train your Dachshund, and use it when you are away or busy. This will keep them safe and comfortable, and prevent them from getting into trouble. Make sure the crate is large enough for them to stand, turn, and lie down, and fill it with a soft bed, a water bowl, and some toys and chews.
  • Fence your yard, and make sure there are no gaps or holes that your Dachshund can squeeze through or dig under. This will keep them contained and secure, and prevent them from escaping or chasing after other animals. You can also use chicken wire, rocks, or plants to cover the areas where they like to dig.
  • Provide your Dachshund with a designated digging spot, such as a sandbox, a kiddie pool, or a flower pot. This will satisfy their natural urge to dig, and divert them from digging elsewhere. You can also bury some treats or toys in the spot, and encourage them to find them.
  • Use a baby gate, a playpen, or a closed door to restrict your Dachshund’s access to certain rooms or areas of your house. This will protect your belongings and furniture from their chewing and scratching, and prevent them from getting into things they shouldn’t. You can also use a pet camera, a speaker, or a remote control device to monitor and correct your Dachshund’s behavior when you are not around.

With proper training, management, and care, you can prevent your Dachshund from damaging your property and disturbing your neighbors.

Dachshund Friendliness & Sociability

Dachshunds are cute and loyal dogs, but they also have some drawbacks that can make them the worst breed for some people. One of these drawbacks is their lack of friendliness and sociability. In this section, we will explore why Dachshunds are not very friendly or sociable, and how to deal with their behavior problems.

Scrappiness & Aggression with Other Dogs

Dachshunds are known for their scrappiness and aggression with other dogs. They were originally bred to hunt badgers and other small animals, and they have a strong prey drive and a fearless attitude. These dogs also have a tendency to be possessive of their toys, food, and owners, and they may not tolerate sharing or intruding. Dachshunds may bark, growl, snap, or bite at other dogs, especially if they are bigger or unfamiliar. They may also get into fights or chase other animals, which can be dangerous for them and others.

To prevent your Dachshund from being aggressive with other dogs, you need to socialize them from an early age. Expose them to different types of dogs, and teach them how to behave properly. Supervise them when they are around other dogs, and intervene if they show signs of aggression. Leashes, muzzles, or crates may sometimes be necessary to keep them under control. You should also spay or neuter your Dachshund, as this can reduce their hormonal and territorial impulses.

Dachshunds are known for their scrappiness and aggression with other dogs.

Need for Socialization

Dachshunds are not very friendly or sociable with people either. They tend to be wary of strangers, and they may bark, nip, or hide from them. Dachshunds may also be aloof or indifferent to people who are not their owners, and they may not enjoy being petted or cuddled by them. Dachshunds are very loyal and devoted to their owners, but they may also be jealous or protective of them, and they may not get along with other members of the household, such as children or guests.

To make your Dachshund more friendly and sociable with people, you need to socialize them from an early age. You need to introduce them to different kinds of people, such as men, women, children, seniors, and people of different ethnicities and appearances. You need to make these interactions positive and rewarding, and avoid forcing or scaring your Dachshund.

You also need to train your Dachshund to obey basic commands, such as sit, stay, come, and leave it, and to respect your authority and boundaries. You should also correct any unwanted behavior, such as barking, nipping, or jumping, and praise any good behavior, such as being calm, quiet, or friendly.

You need to introduce them to different kinds of people, such as men, women, children, seniors, and people of different ethnicities and appearances.

Separation Anxiety & Coping

Dachshunds are not very friendly or sociable, but they are very attached and dependent on their owners. These dogs hate being left alone, and they may suffer from separation anxiety when their owners are away. Separation anxiety is a condition that causes your Dachshund to panic and act out when you leave them alone.

Dachshunds may exhibit symptoms such as barking, howling, whining, chewing, scratching, digging, urinating, defecating, or even trying to escape. Separation anxiety can be stressful and harmful for your Dachshund, as well as for you and your neighbors.

To cope with your Dachshund’s separation anxiety, you need to help them feel more secure and comfortable when you are away. Create a routine and a schedule for your Dachshund, and stick to it. Avoid making a big deal of leaving and returning, and act calmly and casually. Provide your Dachshund with a safe and cozy place to stay, such as a crate, a bed, or a room, and fill it with their favorite toys, treats, and water.

Exercise and play with your Dachshund before you leave, and tire them out. Leave some background noise, such as a radio, a TV, or a fan, to keep them company. Start with short absences, and gradually increase the duration. Consult your vet if your Dachshund’s separation anxiety is severe, and consider using medication, supplements, or calming devices.

You need to help them feel more secure and comfortable when you are away.

Conclusion

Dachshunds are popular and beloved dogs, but they also have some drawbacks that can make them the worst breed for some people. In this article, we have discussed some of these drawbacks, such as:

  • Their health problems, such as back, dental, hip, knee, eye, and weight issues.
  • Their training and housebreaking difficulties, due to their stubbornness, independence, small bladders, and strong smell.
  • Their noise and destruction, due to their barking, hunting, digging, and chewing habits.
  • Their (un)friendliness and (un)sociability, due to their aggression, wariness, aloofness, jealousy, and separation anxiety.

Dachshunds are not the worst breed for everyone, but they are not the best breed for everyone either. They are not for people who want a low-maintenance, easy-going, or friendly dog. They are for people who can handle their challenges and appreciate their personality and charm.

If you want a Dachshund, you need to be prepared, informed, and responsible. You need to find a good breeder or rescue, consult your vet and trainer, and get advice and support from other Dachshund owners.

Dachshunds are not the easiest breed, but they are a rewarding breed. They are loyal, affectionate, and faithful companions. If you are ready to take on the challenge and responsibility of owning a Dachshund, you will have a wonderful and faithful friend.

Thanks for reading - if there's anything else on your mind, use the comment section below!

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